Inside the Medieval World - Passion, Power, Life, and the Everyday World

Welcome to my world exploring the Medieval Mind.

       Here I will explore the often overlooked, underappreciated, and forgotten aspects and events from the 11th to the 15th Century. And a bit of the Elizabethan era may slip in from time to time 

     Which animals made the best pets, were did that tradition get its beginning, how did ladies keep their teeth pearly white, was it really witchcraft, for the love of a mother, astrology, mystics and alchemy, Oh My!  These are just a few of the things I hope to cover.

Visit my Page for Illuminated Manuscripts at:

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Illuminated Manuscripts

 

I have a passion for Illuminated Manuscripts. In the strictest of terms, illuminated manuscripts are a manuscripts with gold or silver in them, the term is now used to refer to any decorated or illustrated manuscript. The skill and devotion that went into these works of art and books of devotion is stunning.

The earliest surviving illuminated manuscripts date from the 5th century, though it was not until about 1100 that the production of manuscripts began to flourish in earnest. This “golden age” of manuscript illumination lasted until the arrival of Gutenberg’s printing press in 1450-55, signaling the beginning of the end of hand-made illuminated manuscripts.

The medieval artist's palette of color was varied, the source of some of those colors is interesting, for example; cochineal (red), a beetle mixed with aluminum salt, China green (green) from buckthorn berries, or Verdigris (yellow) made by boiling copper plates in vinegar.

This is a picture I took at Trinity College in Dublin; it’s a display case in the library showing the different materials used to produce the brilliant colors.

The source of pigments is astonishing; this one was new to me, going back 5000 years.

Egyptian Blue, also known as calcium copper silicate, is one of the first artificial pigments known to have been used by man. The oldest known example of the exquisite pigment is said to be about 5000 years old.

Let Your Dreams Take Flight!

Anne Marie Bouchard